Community Central
Community Central

Hello again everybody! This blog post is the second out of two for this year’s TDOV! I highly recommend checking out the first one, if you haven’t already!

A little paraphrase from yesterday: International Trans Day of Visibility, or TDOV for short, lands on March 31st. For trans lives are precious and it is more crucial than ever during the times that we live to recognize the impact of trans achievements, contributions and resilience. Not only that, but our joy and love ought to be shared and celebrated.

In continuation of our celebration of Trans Day of Visibility, more trans folk from our communities and staff have volunteered to share their stories!

Meet Cori, aka Hewwowouwu[]

CoriforTDOV

Bonjour, hi! I'm Cori (they/she)! I'm originally from a rural town in Québec, Canada but have since moved to the West Coast and I'm an administrator on the RuPaul's Drag Race Wiki! I'm transfemme and I love media analysis, especially that of video games or film, as well as just being a casual fan of reality TV shows... maybe a bit more than just casual for Drag Race though...

How long have you been on Fandom? What wikis are you from, and how did you become inspired to take on a leadership role/be a positive voice in your community?

I've definitely browsed and frequented Fandom since probably around 2015 where a lot of my friends at the time hung out on a now-defunct wiki for a niche community. But I seriously started editing in late 2020 and early 2021 when I really got into my RuPaul's Drag Race obsession that got even stronger during lockdown. This craze is what motivated me to continuously edit on the wiki and update some of the more overlooked pages which eventually lead me to my promotion and comfortability with aiding in maintaining a sense of cohesion and accuracy across the wiki alongside the rest of the wonderful staff.

What are your favorite fandoms and why? Has being transgender had an impact on the types of fandoms/hobbies you gravitate towards?

Obviously the community built around one of the most influential shows in LGBTQ+ representation like seen on the RuPaul's Drag Race Wiki has made me feel comfortable and safe with my identity. But also just communities and fandoms surrounding JRPGs and fighting games in particular have been spaces where there's huge subsets of fellow queer people and specifically trans people that I’ve integrated into. It's funny as prior to coming to terms with my transness, I was exposed to a lot of transphobia online in fandom circles I frequented, but later I realized that there were always these communities with other queer people who liked the same things as me. Overall, it is just so refreshing to find a community of people who enjoy the same pieces of media as well as share similar life experiences.

What is your favorite thing about being a member of the trans community? What is one thing others can learn from the trans community?

One of my favourite things about being a part of the trans community is how liberating it feels to accept a truth about yourself that you've either unintentionally or purposefully neglected for one reason or another. I remember growing up and only wanting the 'girl toys' or playing exclusively as the girl characters in video games and feeling that it was somehow wrong. Due to the perception of boyhood I gathered from my peers, my ‘failure’ to perform masculinity correctly made me feel alienated in a way even though what I was doing gave me so much joy. It felt indulgent in a way, like I still remember being a kid and making my player character in Animal Crossing: City Folk on the Wii a girl all in pink and being so scared of someone walking in on me basically vicariously crossdressing. But I think it was only when I got older that I realized all my fears of following this code of boyhood and masculinity were all just made up. I feel like it's common for trans people to be so hyper aware of gender norms to the point where we deconstruct and reconstruct it to reflect the fluidity of gender and I think that's what others can learn from the trans community. To look inwards with the perspective that gender shouldn't be thought of as such rigid roles that few fit in but instead as something fluid and to never allow others discourage you from exploring becoming an even more authentic version of you.

Could you share your experiences finding and building a support network or community, whether online or in real life?

Fortunately, I have the privilege where my childhood friend group I grew up with continued to be extremely supportive of my transness (I'm pretty sure they knew I was trans before I did). Most of them being cis women helped me navigate aspects of femininity that were foreign to me at the time and they provided me with a safe space to explore my gender. A support system like that is something that I wish for all trans people, especially ones just coming to terms with their identity. Since relocating, I've been able to surround myself with a lot of lovely queer people through spaces like Ballroom who support each other like a found family of sorts. Seeing so many queer people confident of their own identity and living their truths eventually gave me the courage to start doing the same!

Is there a particular moment or instance where seeing (or not seeing) trans representation in gaming or media had a profound effect on you?

Growing up, I often turned to video games for comfort and would just get absolutely absorbed into the stories as a form of escapism of sorts. I feel like in that time period for gaming I grew up with, trans characters were very few and far between. I feel like many trans people my age grew up being attached to characters who weren't even necessarily confirmed as trans. I remember my very first exposure to the idea of gender non-conformity in media being Sheik and Zelda from the Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. I was always so fixated on the idea of being able to switch genders in an instant. As I got older and was drawn to more deeper storytelling in games, I was introduced to characters like Naoto Shirogane from Persona 4 who even though the story backtracks on the trans theming, I can't help but see it as a trans allegory. I don’t need Naoto to be confirmed trans to cite the game as a formative piece of media for me in relation to my gender identity. Especially since having recently experienced Persona 4 again as an adult, I realize that I have so much in common with characters like Naoto. I will thank them for showing me that 'crossdressing' isn't always a gag nor for strictly plot purposes, but that one can genuinely and comfortably live their day to day life presenting as the opposite sex and being perceived as such by their peers.

Looking forward, what are some changes or improvements you'd like to see in the gaming community or media representation of transgender individuals?

Looking forward I really do hope that trans representation in media gets better outside of just simply queer-centric works. I feel like although we need to praise and acknowledge shows like Pose which have done so much in providing positive representation of trans people and more specifically trans women of colour, it's important to note that isn't where we should stop. Positive portrayals of trans people need to continue to exist in other mainstream media. Ultimately, it will not only help to normalize trans peoples' existence but also help humanize trans people to those who've never even met a trans person in their life before. In the realm of gaming, I think there's still a lot of work to be done but it's definitely getting better from what I can tell. Long ago are the days of 2011 game Catherine deadnaming the game's only trans character, now are the days of Bridget from the Guilty Gear series proudly coming out as trans and I can only hope we keep going in this direction!

What are some ways that allies can be the most supportive to you and the trans community?

For trans allies, I think the best first step you can do is to do your own research. Although the sentiment is usually out of genuine curiosity and wanting to better understand trans people, not every trans person is willing to have a conversation about their identity and experience with someone. Additionally, there is a misconception that all trans people are experts on the topic when there's usually a multitude of factors like intersectionality that affect different people's trans experience. Ultimately, trans people are not obligated to explain their identity to anyone. So I encourage allies to use the abundant amount of resources on transness available, especially online where the different opinions and experiences of trans people of different backgrounds are available.

What advice would you give to people who are currently exploring or navigating their identity? (i.e. questioning their gender and/or afraid to express themselves authentically/come out/transition/etc.)

My main advice to those still figuring out their identity is to take your time and don't compare yourself to others because not everyone's journey is the same. Self-discovery and enacting that part of yourself for others to perceive is not at all a linear process nor a comfortable one. It will come with many ups and downs so don't rush it! There is no deadline nor pressure to have it all figured out since even some out trans people still don't have it all figured out! Remember, gender identity is fluid and experimenting with different pronouns, names and presentations are all part of the process of feeling out what feels right and what doesn't. Feelings might change overtime and the whole thing can sometimes be emotionally draining, but just know that eventually the worst will be behind you and the best is yet to come!


Meet Mia, aka MIAWSTIC[]

MiawsticTDOV

My name’s Mia, and my username is MIAWSTIC. I’m nonbinary, and I use they/them! I live in the eastern United States, and I’m primarily an illustrator outside of the wikis I run.

How long have you been on Fandom? What wikis are you from, and how did you become inspired to take on a leadership role/be a positive voice in your community?

I started regularly using Fandom in early-mid 2021, though I had my account before that for casual browsing purposes. My main wiki that I manage is the Cookie Run: Kingdom wiki, where I’m the main bureaucrat, though I’m also an administrator on the general Cookie Run wiki and the Cookie Run: Kingdom OCs wiki.
Honestly, I never really expected myself to be in a leadership position at all. I started wiki editing as an occasional hobby just to help out a new grassroots wiki on Cookie Run: Kingdom, as the general wiki at the time was in disrepair and wasn’t accepting information on this at-the-time new game. Eventually, though, I found that I just really loved working on the wiki, and I eventually stuck around long enough to become a bureaucrat!
It just brings me a lot of personal fulfillment to be able to provide communities with the content they need about the series both they and I myself love—especially when I get to directly see others’ appreciation and trust of such. I’m also given tons of solace by the prospect that this media is being properly preserved and will be visible for future generations—which I can know for sure, because I’m the one doing it!

What are your favorite fandoms and why? Has being transgender had an impact on the types of fandoms/hobbies you gravitate towards?

I am and always have been a huge video game fan. I may be most visibly a fan of more lighthearted series like Cookie Run and Pokemon, but horror and markedly strange media like Yume Nikki hold a special place in my heart!
Being nonbinary definitely does affect the types of media I consume—naturally, I tend to gravitate towards franchises that portray trans people positively (if at all). Cookie Run very much falls into this category, as it has quite a lot of nonbinary and gender nonconforming characters!

How would you describe gender euphoria? What is something that personally brings you gender euphoria?

The simplest way I can describe gender euphoria is just being comfortable in your own skin. It’s knowing that you’re you, and that you’re the you that you know you are, and that others know that, too. It’s goofy, but something that brings me a lot of gender euphoria is wearing short-sleeve flannels with cheesy patterns. I have one I’d gotten from a secondhand shop with a large water crane pattern on it (like, the bird, but construction machines would also be funny), and it’s kind of ugly, but that’s the fun in it. I’m kind of ugly, too, but that’s who I am. It’s fulfilling to wear something that not everyone may like regardless of such, and this works the same way with being yourself.

How do you like to celebrate your identity and share that joy with others?

Honestly, I tend to not really highlight the fact that I’m nonbinary to others—I usually just let them figure that out and feel how they want for themselves. That’s just a me-thing. Still, I always make it a point to thoroughly celebrate Pride Month each year, and my fellow staff and me on the CR:K wiki have extended that into being a wiki-wide celebration every June. CR:K is a largely romance-less franchise in its canon, so our celebrations tend to put the spotlight on the non-cisgender characters of the series. This always brings out a lot of joy in the members of our community, and, through them, I feel a lot of happiness, too.

What is your favorite thing about being a member of the trans community? What is one thing others can learn from the trans community?

One thing that really lies at the heart of being trans is an unadulterated love for being alive, and being happy. I never fail to smile when I come across a post elsewhere of a trans person recounting their own personal journey with their gender, and being absolutely euphoric about how far they’ve come. Discovering the depths of one’s identity/transitioning/however else you interpret being trans is nothing if not a supreme act of self-love, and I think it’s absolutely beautiful to be able to delve into one’s self-fulfillment so unabashedly.

What are some trans people/idols you look up to and why?

Besides my own friends and family, one trans person I can think of whom I look up to is Lauren Bousfield. She’s an astoundingly fantastic musical artist, specializing in absolutely chaotic and mesmerizing tracks somewhere amongst the genres of hyper-pop, electronic, experimental, breakcore, and noise, and she happens to be a trans woman. You’ve probably heard one of her songs without even knowing it, actually; back when she went under the name Nero’s Day at Disneyland, she released the song Child Protective Services Theme, which Pewdiepie himself used as his video outro theme for years back during the 2010’s. Anyways, I’ll always be amazed by both her sheer talent and her perseverance. It is already admirable enough to come out as transgender while already being a well-established artist; Lauren also overcame receiving third-degree burns on her hands and subsequent skin grafts due to a fire in her apartment in 2016, which stopped her from creating for months. Still, she’s always kept strong and continued giving the world her phenomenal, indecipherable works, of which I’ll always be thankful. Those songs helped me an awful lot in high school.

Is there a particular moment or instance where seeing (or not seeing) trans representation in gaming or media had a profound effect on you?

The most impactful instance of trans representation I can think of in recent-ish times for me was actually also in Cookie Run. When first getting into the series as a teenager, I’d grown very attached to the character Dark Choco Cookie, who was believed to be nonbinary at the time (it’s a long story). Seeing such an amazingly cool yet thoroughly deep and emotional character be simultaneously nonbinary—especially while not being particularly androgynous—really flipped a switch in my mind and made me realize, “Hey, I could do that. Am I that? Can I be that?”

Looking forward, what are some changes or improvements you'd like to see in the gaming community or media representation of transgender individuals?

Personally, I’d love to see a shift towards seeing trans people as just that: people. Thinking on that which is closest to me… while Cookie Run does have lots of nonbinary characters—far more than most other big-name series—the tropes on which they tend to rely can be disheartening. In this series and many others, nonbinary characters will be included, but they’ll often be a robot, or an alien, or some sort of animal-hybrid-monster-thing. That’s great and all, but we need more nonbinary characters that are just normal people who happen to be nonbinary. I’ve already seen the negative effects of these tropes set in in my community, as I’ve seen far too many times younger fans looking at a new character who falls into those archetypes and saying, “Oh, I thought this was going to be a they/them, haha.” Resting on one’s laurels in this way can really be dangerous, and I think we’re just blocking the way towards any progress in normalizing real nonbinary people by always doing it.

What advice would you give to people who are currently exploring or navigating their identity? (i.e. questioning their gender and/or afraid to express themselves authentically/come out/transition/etc.)

It’s never too late. Seriously! There is nothing wrong with realizing you’re trans at 25, or 35, or 50, or 65, or even later. Whatever! It’s also not at all selfish to be trans or to realize that your happiness or well-being deserve to be put first sometimes; being trans is all about loving and discovering yourself, and just making sure that you can live with yourself happily. Which is much less an act of selfishness and more just a common human right! It’s also okay to change your mind in any direction. You’re not being a trend-follower or flake by changing your mind about your gender—gender is an always-fluctuating thing, as is your own mind and your convictions.


Next up, one of our Wiki Specialists!

Meet Minerva, aka Tagaziel[]

MinervaforTDOV

Hi, I'm Tagaziel, known in meatspace as Minerva since I started my transition journey (from he/him to she/her). I was born in Poland in the primordial era - 1988 - and I've been working on wikis profesionally for ten years. I got my start at Curse, working on Gamepedia, and then for Fandom (going from wiki manager, to wiki represenative, to wiki specialist). I might be thirty six at this point, but I'm still a freshly cracked egg. The realization I'm actually transgender came late in my life, answering a lot of questions that cropped up over the years that I felt were natural and every human being had them. My wife helped me, explaining that she doesn't question her gender on a daily basis and she's very comfortable in her skin. That was the push I needed, and I've never felt happier with myself than I am now. Fun fact: We've been together for fifteen years as of 2024 and still going strong, and met at the university while studying law. I have a Master's, she has a doctorate, which makes for some very interesting conversations in the morning - we're both nerds when it comes to history and hope to inspire our son to also develop an unhealthy appetite for real-life lore

What are your favorite fandoms and why? Has being transgender had an impact on the types of fandoms you gravitate towards?

My favorite fandoms? I love a lot of them, from books, through movies, to gaming. My home wiki and, in fact, one of the things that helped me get a job as a wiki manager, is the Fallout Wiki. The series formed a huge part of my life, providing escapism when I needed it most, and helped me find some of the most supportive people in my life - and also enter the furry fandom, whose radical acceptance and support helped me through some of the toughest years of my life. Beyond that there's a laundry list of movies, books, video games and other topics I'm a huge fan of and geek over, from the works of sci-fi luminaries like Heinlein, Herbert, or Ellison, to obscure video games and movies that only I played and enjoyed (and then authored a complete wiki).

How would you describe gender euphoria? What is something that personally brings you gender euphoria?

When it comes to gender euphoria, the feeling I associate with it is peace. I spent literaly decades of my life living in anxiety, wearing a body that felt two sizes too large for me, never quite feeling right. I felt like a badly costumed player on a stage, doing things that didn't come naturally to me. I felt it was the default for human existence, but ever since the egg cracked, I discovered that I'm not condemned to live out my years as a man. A combination of make-up, clothes picked out with or by my wife (who remains the most supportive person in my life), and I finally see someone I like in the mirror, someone I am inside, rather than an approximation that feels off (if you know what Uncanny Valley is, imagine living with that). I'm genuinely smiling at myself and I finally feel confident and self-assured, no longer playing (which amazes me, as I measure nearly 190 cm with the frame of a work horse).

Is there a particular moment or instance where seeing (or not seeing) trans representation in gaming or media had a profound effect on you?

I treasure every bit of trans representation in games and anywhere I can define my own character holds a special place in my heart. There is a noted absence of trans people in entertainment, but that doesn't stop us from making our own stories: For me, my Tagaziel is more than just a character, she's a reflection of myself, and I have worked my transition into her story. The moment I switched over in ESO was an especially important one for me. That said, I love when I see trans people represented. Claire in Cyberpunk 2077 was a wonderfully realized character, for instance, and an inspiring one - which is all the more important given that Poland routinely lands in the last spot whenever LGBT rights across the European Union are checked.

As a trans person in the workplace, what’s one thing you want others to know about you?

I don't bite. Really. I'm actually a chatterbox and if anyone asks me questions, I'm liable to answer them completely and at length. So ask away!

In the workplace, what experiences and connections have made you feel welcomed?

I think being able to openly talk about who I am and be treated as I wish to be treated. I generally try to do my best to help others, so receiving help and support when I needed it most was amazing. Jieyang and Tots were incredibly supportive when I discussed it in private, and my fellow Wiki Reps/Specialists were both supportive and inspiring. I credit Kurt with inspiring me to just be who I am and go out there as myself, rather than keep putting it off.

Have you experienced situations that were not fully inclusive or understanding towards transgender individuals while at work? How could those situations be avoided or improved?

I haven't really experienced any adverse situations at work. We don't go for the throat over mistakes or forgetfulness, and it's been a smooth experience all the way.

What are some ways that allies can be the most supportive to you and other trans colleagues?

For support, simply using our chosen names and pronouns, and treating us as normal humans. I'm still Tagaziel, after all, and I love to talk shop or share obscure historical facts any time of day. I feel that treating each other as we'd like to be treated is a good guideline in general.

Is there a common myth or misconception about the transgender community that you wish to correct or dispel for a broader understanding?

As noted above, we don't go for the throat over mistakes or forgetfulness. We all stumble and make mistakes, and at least I appreciate putting in the effort to treat us as who we are, not who someone thinks we are. If in doubt, just ask, we really don't bite.

What is your favorite thing about being a member of the trans community? What is one thing others can learn from the trans community?

I think the greatest experience has been the level of mutual support and understanding shown to each other. I've been a member of communities where members tear each other down for sport in the past, and the trans and queer community in general... I have cried with joy over this radical acceptance I experience more than once. Acceptance and support matter so much.

What guidance or wisdom would you share with those who are currently exploring or navigating their identity?

I could go on for hours, but the one thing I learned in the past months is that while your mileage may vary, you are usually surrounded by far more supporters and friends than you are by enemies and foes. Switching over to a Friend-Rich Environment mindset has worked wonders for me and enabled me to be a much, much better person in general and defused much of my anxiety. Plus, don't be afraid to do radical things. I quit coffee last month and I'm not going back!

Lastly, how do you think we can best celebrate trans lives, whether that be in the workplace or in our own everyday lives?

To celebrate trans lives, make us feel like a part of the community. Not singled out, not treated as weird, not held up as a token queer friend, just accept us for who we are.


And now, one of our core coordinators for this project!

Meet Gabby[]

GabbyforTDOV

Hello! I’m Gabby Parker, a Sr. People Business Partner here at Fandom. I support the Content, Fanatical Business Operations, and Community team with all things People-related. I’m non-binary, trans-masc (trans-masculine) and live in Austin, Texas. As for fun facts? I’ve been to 20 National Parks in the past two years! My favorite so far has been Death Valley; it was one of the best off-grid camping experiences I’ve had with a perfectly dark sky for stargazing and it’s just a very other-wordly landscape. Also, you can go see the rarest fish in the world, the Devil’s Hole pupfish. They’re super cute and really do have the personalities of a puppy.

What are your favorite fandoms and why? Has being transgender had an impact on the types of fandoms you gravitate towards?

My fave fandoms are RuPaul's Drag Race and all the Real Housewives drama I can get. Being trans, my journey can definitely intertwine with the types of fandoms that I’m drawn to. Shows like RuPaul's Drag Race don't just entertain me; they resonate deeply, reflecting the multifaceted nature of gender and sexuality all while draped in charisma, uniqueness, nerve, and talent. This show and fandom provides a platform where gender is not just a binary to be adhered to but a vast landscape to be explored and celebrated. Drag Race has seen drag queens who are trans, non-binary, gender fluid, cis (same gender presumed at birth), and all kinds of different sexualities, even a straight cis man! (Maddy Morphosis, one of my favorites). As for the Real Housewives – there’s nothing too deep about this one, I live for the drama and seeing who’s going to throw a glass of wine or implode the next luxury housewives trip.

How would you describe gender euphoria? What is something that personally brings you gender euphoria?

I guess to describe the excitement of gender euphoria, I have to briefly describe the feeling of gender dysphoria. Gender dysphoria is like looking at a puzzle with one piece out of place; it's all you can focus on, making the whole picture feel wrong. Gender euphoria, on the other hand, is the relief and satisfaction of snapping that piece into its rightful spot, instantly transforming the puzzle into a complete, satisfying picture. It's that moment of rightness and wholeness after feeling incomplete and confused. I had my first sense of gender euphoria when my friend gifted me a few binders (a compression top that makes the chest flatter and more masculine). I put on a men’s button up with the binder on and seeing my physique look more masculine for the first time in my life was something that finally made who I was looking at in the mirror just feel right.

Is there a particular moment or instance where seeing (or not seeing) trans representation in gaming or media had a profound effect on you?

Well, there isn’t really a lot of non-binary, trans-masc representation out there so when something does come around that is reflective of my lived experience, it definitely sticks with me. The series Feel Good with comedian Mae Martin is probably the closest reflection of my own gender identity journey that I’ve seen. There’s a scene where Mae is in rehab and the counselor tells Mae that they missed Women’s Yoga and Mae responds with, “I don't actually, really identify as a woman these days, just so you know," and the counselor asks, "What do you identify as?" and Mae just simply responds, "Err, kind of like an Adam Driver or a Ryan Gosling…I'm still working it out." and that was the end of that conversion! It was so chill, understanding, and not a huge deal (which is not typically the case when telling people you know about any transitions with gender). It was amazing to see it represented on a major Netflix show and Mae’s response was extremely relatable. Another one of my favorite quotes from Mae in Feel Good is, “I’m not a boy. I’m not even a girl. I’m like a failed version of both” (the sarcastic dark humor is on point in this series)

In the workplace, what experiences and connections have made you feel welcomed?

So in my role as an HR Business Partner, I have to partner with and gain the trust of all types of employees, from C-Suite Execs to front-line leaders and employees. Due to this, I’ve worked with a variety of people from different backgrounds and I’ve been fortunate enough to have had quite a few really respectful experiences within the workplace that have made me feel welcomed. Typically, the common factor with these experiences is respectful curiosity. One story that comes to mind was when I started a new HR Business Partner role at an Austin-founded Financial tech company and had to meet the new C-Suite Executive that I would be partnering with. I was pretty apprehensive about this meeting; I mean the company itself is in the banking/financial services industry with strong roots in Texas which really just exudes old-school conservatism, and to top it all off, this Executive’s Slack profile picture was one of the Duck Dynasty men in the American flag. We have our initial intro call and I can tell he was a bit surprised by the pronouns in my Zoom box.
The next day, he asks if we can talk really quick and I get a knot in my stomach. We get on the call and he starts by saying, “Listen, I am about to be a bit blunt here, and I hope I am approaching this okay…”, and my head is just spinning and I’m bracing for a problematic situation. Then he says, “I really want to respect your pronouns but you are the first person I’ve met who uses ‘they/them’ and I know I’m going to mess it up. I just wanted to see if you have any tips on how I might practice so that you don’t have to be put in that position.”
Y’all, my mouth must’ve dropped to the floor in amazement. I ended up telling him that I only expect the effort, not the perfection, when it comes to my pronouns and that I fully understood that everyone is at different levels of learning when it comes to it. I also told him that if he does mess up, to please just correct himself and continue moving forward with the learning process. We ended up partnering for 3 years and we became very good friends. When I left that company, it was very emotional and he let me know that I had helped him be a better father because his own kid (14 yrs old) is questioning their gender identity. He is now the Executive sponsor of the Pride ERG (Employee Resource Group) that I founded and is carrying on the allyship work in full force. Everyone could learn a lesson from Bill when it comes to being an ally in life and the workplace.

What is your favorite thing about being a member of the trans community? What is one thing others can learn from the trans community?

Ugh I get emotional thinking about this question because the trans community is so beautiful and I wish everyone could experience it. Most, if not all, of us have experienced severe and chronic trauma and adversity. There are also those of us who either have strained or non-existent relationships with our birth family due living authentically. Then you have those of us who have experienced blatant hate and ostracization in society, even physical violence. Due to all of this, our understanding of what makes a “family” and how we seek safety and support is forced to evolve. This all makes the trans community an extremely giving, compassionate, patient, and protective community. I think we really treat and love each other the way we wish our birth families and society would treat and love us. I feel like the rest of the world could really use more of those qualities, but instead remains trapped in societal norms that are meant to create rifts between people, place us in boxes, and give power to those who are not seen as “other”. Our community is truly an open-arms community whose main focus is to help each other survive, whether that be financially, physically, or emotionally.

What guidance or wisdom would you share with those who are currently exploring or navigating their identity?

This is a fun one. I think if you are currently exploring your gender identity or even your own sexuality, don’t overthink the fluctuations in how you identify over time! While the world has attempted to enforce the concept that you are either x or y or z or (you get the point), it doesn’t stop humans from being much more complicated and complex than that. Embrace the journey of self-discovery as a dynamic process, one that allows for growth and change. Your experiences and feelings are valid, regardless of how they may evolve. And if you are ever spiraling into the depths of an existential crisis, just remember that navigating your identity is a personal journey that doesn’t need to fit neatly into predefined categories or labels or even stay the same over time.


And lastly... I wonder who this could be...

Meet Kurt, aka OishiiOnIno[]

OishiiforTDOV

Well, howdy! I’m Kurt, a gaming community manager here on Fandom. I’m a queer trans man from a rural town on the east coast of the US. I love cats, outdoorsin', alternative music and video games!

What are your favorite fandoms and why? Has being transgender had an impact on the types of fandoms you gravitate towards?

I have so many, it’s hard to narrow it down! One of my favorite fandoms is Resident Evil. I've been playing the games ever since I could hold a controller. I love horror and the balance between being serious, so serious that it’s goofy, and not taking itself seriously enough to be witty.
Playing video games and getting into cosplay were integral to exploring my identity when I was younger. They provided a safe environment to dip my toes into a more masculine perception of myself. It started with me cosplaying my favorite male characters from different video games and anime shows, and eventually I started creating my own male characters in video games. To this day, I definitely gravitate to video games and other forms of media where I can be myself, or see myself somewhere in the storyline. However, it is not so direct as requiring an openly transgender character for me to feel that way. Anyone can be trans, and there’s really no higher honor in my head than headcanoning my favorite character as trans.

How would you describe gender euphoria? What is something that personally brings you gender euphoria?

It led me to finding myself. It’s this giddy, bubbly sensation that forms in the gut and blooms warmly through my chest. It can also be the prickle of tears at the corners of my eyes, like the first time I saw my chest after top surgery. Joy, authenticity, recognition– me. I spent what feels like ages reimagining myself as someone that I can love. I knew I was doing something right when I was disapprovingly told I “look like a boy” as a teen, because it made me so much happier than any other compliments I got at the time. I chased that spark relentlessly, defying the expectations that surrounded me because I refuse to be anyone but myself. It is the tender hug that envelops me whole. It is the relief I desperately sought.

Is there a particular moment or instance where seeing (or not seeing) trans representation in gaming or media had a profound effect on you?

Dragon Age always had queer characters, no doubt, ranging in sexuality and gender identity. Dragon Age Inquisition introduced me to Krem Aclassi. It was my first time encountering a trans male character in a AAA game that discussed his identity openly with the rapt support of his peers. So he’s special to me. I don’t exactly see myself in him, but I have a brotherly respect for him. I was sad I couldn’t introduce my character as transgender when I met him so we could bond over it, but, the scripting was a decent step in the right direction. For the time. He introduced a lot of people to trans men that otherwise wouldn’t know we existed.

As a trans person in the workplace, what’s one thing you want others to know about you?

My goal is to connect with as many of you as possible! I believe there is something good to be learned from every person I meet.

In the workplace, what experiences and connections have made you feel welcomed?

Getting to see people like me in other parts of the company! This project has brought us together and we've had the support of allies every step of the way!

Is there a common myth or misconception about the transgender community that you wish to correct or dispel for a broader understanding?

The existence of transgender people dates farther back than the establishment of the gender binary that most people perceive as “traditional” today. We are not a product of a recent "trend" or anything else. Trans people have existed as long as there has been a concept of gender amongst people, and it has always varied per culture.

What is your favorite thing about being a member of the trans community? What is one thing others can learn from the trans community?

Our ability to deconstruct the way society dictates conformity. When you realize that your mere existence is a direct challenge to the “norm”, you start to question everything upholding it.

What guidance or wisdom would you share with those who are currently exploring or navigating their identity?

Our entire lives are spent changing. Don’t adhere to what you think is the “correct” way to present or carry yourself. A lot of that is the expectations of others and nothing to do with you, not on the inside. Nothing can limit you. Only you get to decide who you are, no one should be able to take that from you. Take power in having agency over yourself and never, ever, be guilty for it. Let your heart do the work and the uncertainty will melt away.


Thank you![]

Thank you to everyone who has taken the time to share such important and profound parts of themselves, as well as those who helped coordinate this behind the scenes. We came together to create something truly beautiful. We had an idea and a passion, and we did it! I am so proud to share a community with each of you. Happy Trans Day of Visibility!

It has been an honor to have the opportunity to use my new platform to share so many trans stories with you all. Through this, hopefully you learned more about trans people and our livelihoods! Maybe there are some parts you could relate to? At the end of the day, we are not all so different.

And a special question for you, the reader: How does recognizing and celebrating Trans Day of Visibility impact your understanding and acceptance of gender diversity?


Oishiipfp
Fandom Staff
Gaming Community Manager, (he/him)
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