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edit: Oh, and it's a habit I picked up years ago - I don't know if it's a good practice, but I routinely just encode HTML entities when storing strings to a database to avoid possible problems.
 
edit: Oh, and it's a habit I picked up years ago - I don't know if it's a good practice, but I routinely just encode HTML entities when storing strings to a database to avoid possible problems.
   
Kinda offtopic, but when I was working on a file hosting site, I discovered that PHP doesn't allow writing some extended characters in windows filenames, but can handle the strings in the database just fine - I still haven't worked out a solution to this problem, but I haven't really thought about it in a while...
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Kinda offtopic, but when I was working on a file hosting site, I discovered that PHP doesn't allow writing some extended characters in windows filenames, but can handle the strings in the database just fine - so I needed to store the files on disc with a different filename. I still haven't worked out a solution to this problem, but I haven't really thought about it in a while...
:edit again: Now I think about it, the same thing happens with wikia, you can upload a file, specify a filename with extended characters, but the extended characters are stripped out of the filename when you download it.
 

Latest revision as of 22:33, November 1, 2012

Some text editors don't display those characters correctly, so when copy/pasting from the edit window into an text editor and back again will lose the characters. The same can happen after exporting pages and editing them and importing them again.

It's an extreme edge case of course, but one I've run into. (I just checked and å works fine)

The RTE normally converts those HTML entities back into the extended characters anyway, so my manual replacements on some pages didn't last long.

I guess we'll see after they fix the current editor problem exactly what the intended behaviour is.

edit: Oh, and it's a habit I picked up years ago - I don't know if it's a good practice, but I routinely just encode HTML entities when storing strings to a database to avoid possible problems.

Kinda offtopic, but when I was working on a file hosting site, I discovered that PHP doesn't allow writing some extended characters in windows filenames, but can handle the strings in the database just fine - so I needed to store the files on disc with a different filename. I still haven't worked out a solution to this problem, but I haven't really thought about it in a while...

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